Shetland Sheep – Lawnmowers That Reproduce


Twizzler presented us with two beautiful black ewe lambs on May 2nd of this year. For a homestead farm, this was a multiple blessings event. Our small herd increased in size with two ewe lambs that are not related to our ram. This means next year the farm will have four breedable ewes.
Our natural lawn mowers have done an excellent job of keeping the back yard mowed and have learned how to stay in an electric fence. This has given us the ability to turn the sheep out with the horses or the cows, increasing their grazing area and preventing them from over-grazing the yard.
There is another section of yard which will be fenced for them to graze, but other projects and work schedules have stood in the way of its’ completion. One project at a time and things are changing and getting accomplished. With so much more left to do, there’s never a dull moment.
The ewes were named Rebecca and Sharon. Sharon has a little more white around her face if you want to tell them apart. They are still small enough that they are able to move freely from section to section, but seemed to learn rapidly why they shouldn’t come out of the fence. Although my Aussie/Heeler mix (Angel) won’t hurt them, she does herd well and got in behind them to show them the way home. They only tried it twice.
I am looking forward to breeding the two ewes again this fall. Ram lambs will be made into wethers and raised for the freezer while ewe lambs will be sold. Fall of 2011, I’ll be able to breed all four of the girls and then there will be babies everywhere!

If you are thinking of adding sheep to your farm or in keeping a pet lawn mower in the yard, you should check out Shetland Sheep. They are quite adaptable, non-agressive, good mothers, and have beautiful wool. Since they are a little smaller it is easy to maintain a small herd on small acreage.

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